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Category: Education & Teaching

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching multi-part question and nee

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Assessment DescriptionThe cognitive and educational evaluation is a main data source for MET teams to determine eligibility and placement for special education services. All team members must make decisions and advocate for educational instruction, strategies, and placement based on evaluation report results. Collaboration with parents about sharing evaluation results and seeking consent for special education services is also a required professional and legal element. Teachers should gain valuable skills and knowledge regarding analysis, decision-making, and sharing results that pertain to cognitive and educational evaluations.Part 1: Formal and Informal AssessmentRead the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report” provided for student Adam Gallery. Based on the report, create a table with a column for each formal and informal assessment. Complete the table with the following information, labeling each column and row:In the first row, clearly identify each assessment.
In the second row, describe how each assessment is technically sound and minimizes rater bias
In the next row, provide a summary of Adam’s results on each assessment that will help guide appropriate educational decisions. (Do not simply cut and paste the findings.)
In the last row, explain why the selected assessment tool is appropriate for diagnosing Adam’s strengths and needs.
Beneath the table, in a 500-750 word analysis, advocate for the appropriate educational decisions for this student based on the assessment results. The analysis should include:Recommendations for any needed classroom accommodations or modifications, and placement for specific content areas.
Appropriate accommodations for Adam’s assessments or testing conditions, including the use of technology for these accommodations.
Reflection on the role of special education teachers as advocates for students to help students realize and develop their unique talents and skills.
Part 2: Parent ScriptUsing the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report,” compose a 250-500 word script seeking consent for special education services from Adam’s parents. Your script should include a hypothetical conversation (e.g., provide the actual verbiage/wording that would be exchanged) with the parents where results of the MET report are appropriately relayed and specific wording seeking consent for services is included.Support your findings by citing the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report” where appropriate.While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. A link to the LopesWrite technical support articles is located in Class Resources if you need assistance.Program competencies and national standards assessed in the benchmark assignment:MED in Special Education ITL/NITLMED in Special Education Mild to Moderate Disabilities (Nevada)4.1: Select and use technically sound formal and informal assessments that minimize bias. [CEC 4.1, ICSI.4.K1, ICSI.4.K2, ICSI.4.K4. ICSI.4.S1, ICSI.4.S5, ICSI.4.S2, ICSI.4.S8, IGC.4.K1, IGC.4.K3, IGC.4.S1, IGC.4.S2, IGC.4.S3, IGC.4.S4; InTASC 6(a), 6(b), 6(h), 6(j), 6(k); MC2, MC3, MC5]4.3: In collaboration with colleagues and families, use multiple types of assessment information in making decisions about individuals with disabilities. [CEC 4.3, ICSI.4.K1, ICSI.4.K2, ICSI.4.S4, ICSI.4.S1, ICSI.4.S6, ICSI.6.K4, ICSI.7.K2, ICSI.7.K3, ICSI.7.K4, ICSI.7.S2, ICSI.7.S3, ICSI.7.S4, ICSI.7.S5, ICSI.7.S3, ICSI.7.S10, IGC.4.K1, IGC.4.K2, IGC.4.K3, IGC.7.K2, IGC.7.S2; InTASC 6(g), 6(i), 6(o), 6(t), 6(v), 9(c), 9(l) 10(a); MC1, MC2, MC3, MC4, MC5]4.5: Prepare all students for the demands of particular assessment formats and make appropriate accommodations in assessments or testing conditions for students with disabilities. [CEC 4.1, ICSI.4.K4, ICSI.4.S2, ICSI.4.S3, ICSI.4.S4, IGC.4.S3; InTASC 6(e), 6(h), 6(p), 6(u); ISTE-T 2d, 4b; MC2, MC4, MC5]6.5: Advance the profession by engaging in activities such as advocacy and mentoring. [CEC 6.5, ICSI.6.K2, IGC.6.K4, ICSI.6.K6, ICSI.6.S1, ICSI.6.S2, ICSI.6.S4, ICSI.6.S5, ICSI.6.S6, IGC.6.K5, IGC.6.S2; InTASC 10(j); MC1, MC3, MC4]

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching multi-part question and nee

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching multi-part question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Assessment DescriptionThe cognitive and educational evaluation is a main data source for MET teams to determine eligibility and placement for special education services. All team members must make decisions and advocate for educational instruction, strategies, and placement based on evaluation report results. Collaboration with parents about sharing evaluation results and seeking consent for special education services is also a required professional and legal element. Teachers should gain valuable skills and knowledge regarding analysis, decision-making, and sharing results that pertain to cognitive and educational evaluations.Part 1: Formal and Informal AssessmentRead the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report” provided for student Adam Gallery. Based on the report, create a table with a column for each formal and informal assessment. Complete the table with the following information, labeling each column and row:In the first row, clearly identify each assessment.
In the second row, describe how each assessment is technically sound and minimizes rater bias
In the next row, provide a summary of Adam’s results on each assessment that will help guide appropriate educational decisions. (Do not simply cut and paste the findings.)
In the last row, explain why the selected assessment tool is appropriate for diagnosing Adam’s strengths and needs.
Beneath the table, in a 500-750 word analysis, advocate for the appropriate educational decisions for this student based on the assessment results. The analysis should include:Recommendations for any needed classroom accommodations or modifications, and placement for specific content areas.
Appropriate accommodations for Adam’s assessments or testing conditions, including the use of technology for these accommodations.
Reflection on the role of special education teachers as advocates for students to help students realize and develop their unique talents and skills.
Part 2: Parent ScriptUsing the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report,” compose a 250-500 word script seeking consent for special education services from Adam’s parents. Your script should include a hypothetical conversation (e.g., provide the actual verbiage/wording that would be exchanged) with the parents where results of the MET report are appropriately relayed and specific wording seeking consent for services is included.Support your findings by citing the “Analyzing Cognitive and Educational Evaluation Report” where appropriate.While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.This assignment uses a rubric. Review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. A link to the LopesWrite technical support articles is located in Class Resources if you need assistance.Program competencies and national standards assessed in the benchmark assignment:MED in Special Education ITL/NITLMED in Special Education Mild to Moderate Disabilities (Nevada)4.1: Select and use technically sound formal and informal assessments that minimize bias. [CEC 4.1, ICSI.4.K1, ICSI.4.K2, ICSI.4.K4. ICSI.4.S1, ICSI.4.S5, ICSI.4.S2, ICSI.4.S8, IGC.4.K1, IGC.4.K3, IGC.4.S1, IGC.4.S2, IGC.4.S3, IGC.4.S4; InTASC 6(a), 6(b), 6(h), 6(j), 6(k); MC2, MC3, MC5]4.3: In collaboration with colleagues and families, use multiple types of assessment information in making decisions about individuals with disabilities. [CEC 4.3, ICSI.4.K1, ICSI.4.K2, ICSI.4.S4, ICSI.4.S1, ICSI.4.S6, ICSI.6.K4, ICSI.7.K2, ICSI.7.K3, ICSI.7.K4, ICSI.7.S2, ICSI.7.S3, ICSI.7.S4, ICSI.7.S5, ICSI.7.S3, ICSI.7.S10, IGC.4.K1, IGC.4.K2, IGC.4.K3, IGC.7.K2, IGC.7.S2; InTASC 6(g), 6(i), 6(o), 6(t), 6(v), 9(c), 9(l) 10(a); MC1, MC2, MC3, MC4, MC5]4.5: Prepare all students for the demands of particular assessment formats and make appropriate accommodations in assessments or testing conditions for students with disabilities. [CEC 4.1, ICSI.4.K4, ICSI.4.S2, ICSI.4.S3, ICSI.4.S4, IGC.4.S3; InTASC 6(e), 6(h), 6(p), 6(u); ISTE-T 2d, 4b; MC2, MC4, MC5]6.5: Advance the profession by engaging in activities such as advocacy and mentoring. [CEC 6.5, ICSI.6.K2, IGC.6.K4, ICSI.6.K6, ICSI.6.S1, ICSI.6.S2, ICSI.6.S4, ICSI.6.S5, ICSI.6.S6, IGC.6.K5, IGC.6.S2; InTASC 10(j); MC1, MC3, MC4]

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching writing question and need a

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Lecture NotesWelcome to lesson 8! This is the final lesson for this course and it is very fitting that assessments and evaluation tools are going to be the main area of focus. I am sure that as you have gone through this course that you have stopped and informally evaluated your own learning by asking yourself comprehension questions (Did I understand what I just read? Can I apply what I am learning to my own teaching practice?) You are then formally assessed with an achievement exam that allows me, your course facilitator, to evaluate your overall understanding of the subject matter. Whether you realize it or not, evaluations and assessments are being used constantly to reassure the individual (you) and others (such as your teacher) that a particular skill or concept has been mastered. Here are some statements you will want to think about as you read and perhaps even use to evaluate your overall understanding of this lesson. See if you can summarize the function of assessments in music and movement, use the NAEYC and NAAECS/SDE position statement on assessments, demonstrate ethical conduct when evaluating children, create different types of assessment in movement and music that enhance emotional well-being and participation of children, and examine the Guiding Principles in order to create assessments.If you are new to education one of the most popular catch phrases you will hear when walking into a school is implementing “data driven instruction.” What does this mean and how will this affect you as a teacher? Data driven instruction is instruction that is based upon achievement rates of students. This data is then used to guide the teacher on what skills and concepts need to be taught in the classroom. Data driven instruction may guide a teacher on how to group students in the classroom during centers or how to differentiate instruction. You are probably thinking to yourself, “Data driven instruction will not affect me because I am going to be teaching movement and music.” Think again. In today’s educational world every subject, every concept, can be assessed and evaluated whether informally (teacher observation) or formally (national and state standardized tests). Just to give you an overview, the school where I teach regroups students every six to eight weeks based on student data. Luckily, this lesson will focus on how to create and implement assessments and evaluations consistently, effectively, and hopefully without too much pain.When creating or implementing an assessment you will want to ask yourself the following four questions. Is this assessment reliable? Is this assessment valid? Is this assessment culturally and linguistically appropriate? Is this assessment meeting the needs of the student and the family? If an assessment is reliable, a teacher could give the test several times and get the same results each time. If an assessment is valid then it is measuring the concept or skill intended to be measured. If an assessment is culturally and linguistically appropriate then it is considerate of a child’s culture and language acquisition levels. If an assessment is meeting the needs of the family, then the child’s family understands why the assessment is being implemented and its importance to learning.Another very important topic in this lesson is ethical conduct. Teachers need to make sure that assessments and evaluations are given ethically and that a child’s overall well-being is the top priority. The NAEYC developed a position statement on the Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment. This code ensures that an assessment or evaluation is used in order to benefit the child and provide guidance for the teacher and child in relation to learning development. Needless to say, a child’s assessments are confidential. They should only be shared with the student (if the concern is appropriate for the child to know), the family, and members of the school who have a direct impact on the child’s educational programming. In the supplementary resource section, I have provided you with a link to the NAEYC website. This link will take you directly to the position statement. You will want to review the position statement for your own knowledge because you never know when you will need this information in the future (perhaps even for a job interview).Know that you are aware of the code of conduct that is used with giving assessments; we are ready to discuss different types of assessments. I have already mentioned informal (teacher observation, practice sheets, and homework) and formal (state tests and end of unit exams) assessments. However, these assessments can be summative or formative. Summative assessments usually happen at the end of teaching a concept or unit. For example, when students complete the chapter on dinosaurs, the teacher will give an end of chapter test that covers all the concepts the students learned about locomotor movements (walking, leaping, and running). However, a formative assessment is used when a teacher is finished teaching a specific concept in the overarching theme (a quiz on proper running formation or an activity on running at a certain speed). The results of the formative assessment are then used to help influence the teacher’s instruction and teaching strategies for each individual student. I know from past experiences that a formative assessment is more of a reflection of my own teaching. It acts as a yield sign as if letting me know if it is okay for me to move on to a new concept or if I need to take a step back and revisit a specific skill in order for the students to be successful. You will find that many of the assessments you give in music and movement will be performance based. Therefore, you will need to create rubrics that indicate a child’s mastery. When rubrics are used effectively it takes the subjectivity out of assessing and replaces it with objectivity.There are many types of assessments and ways to evaluate your students. However, I have just a few words of wisdom I have learned from my own experiences: do not over assess your students, but assess your students meaningfully and with knowledge of how you will utilize the data from the assessment to benefit the whole child.You have done an excellent job in this course through much perseverance and determination on your part. I know great things await you. As you near graduation, I would like to leave you with the inspiring words of Margaret Fuller—“If you have knowledge, let others light their candles at it.”You now have the knowledge. As you go out into your chosen field, do not be afraid to let others light their candles at your flame of knowledge. You have a lot to offer!

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching writing question and need a

Learning Goal: I’m working on a education & teaching writing question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.Lecture NotesWelcome to Lesson 4! With the completion of this lesson you will be halfway done with this course! Now that you have refreshed your knowledge of the fundamentals of child development and learned how movement and music enhance the development of children in all domains, we are now ready to move on to the movement program. As you read, see if you can summarize the relationship of movement and music, select movement lessons that are developmentally appropriate, examine community and family involvement in culturally sensitive movement and music activities, model the content of developmentally appropriate movement activities, and choose movement lessons that develop fine motor skills.The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has created standards for children grades K-12. However, in this lesson we will focus on standards that are relevant to the development of students in grades pre-K through third. Within these standards the International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, and Dance has created benchmarks that can be used for students in grades 3 or higher. Fortunately, these benchmarks can be modified for our youngest learners, which enable the student, the parents, and the teacher to track an individual’s progress. While there are many associations that have a hand in developing standards, guidelines, and benchmarks, the overall goal is the same: each student to have daily movement experiences that are fit for each child’s individual needs.As you read through this lesson, you will want to pay extra close attention to the sub categories that make up essential movement concepts. The reason for this is that each individual movement concept is a building block to a future skill. Among these listed below are the sub categories for movement concepts.Body awareness
Space awareness
Movement quality
Relationship awareness
It would be very difficult to teach a child a movement lesson if the child is not aware of his or her body parts. Could you imagine teaching a child how to kick a ball if he or she cannot identify his or her foot? Therefore, it is imperative that teachers begin with the basics of body awareness when teaching early childhood students. As a teacher, you will want to create lessons and activities that make learning the body engaging. Some texts suggest several different songs like “If You’re Happy and You Know It,” as well as games like “Move Around My Body, Squirrel,” that encourage students to learn this essential concept (Gallagher & Sayre, 2015).From here, you will want to teach students about space awareness. Defining space for a child is a very difficult concept for children to grasp because it is so abstract. As well, young students have little control of how his or her body moves (picture little kids running with arms and legs flying in all directions). When discussing space with young students you will want to discuss self-space. One way I like to teach about self-space is having students move apart with the arms spread out wide and legs apart. When they have done this I will ask, “Are you touching any other person? Do you have enough space to move around comfortably?” Space awareness also includes directions, levels, and pathways. This includes how the body moves in different directions, with different heights, and with different movements. As children become comfortable with space and movement, it is time to develop the fine motor skills.The development of fine motor skills is not only important in physical education but in all curriculums. Fine motor skills, such as grasping, helps a child learn how to hold a pencil correctly. Eye-hand coordination allows for the pencil to make contact with the paper and for writing to begin. Bimanual control allows scissors to be held and used properly. As you can see, there is a lot of work that needs to be done in order for students to develop these skills. However, this work should not be the job of the teacher alone, and including the community and the student’s parents is imperative! Not only will this create a partnership between you and the parent, but it will also give you time to learn more about your students, his or her culture, and prior experiences that have created the child you are teaching.Parent involvement is an important aspect of a movement and music program and authors may focus heavily on this topic. When parents were asked, “What do you hope to accomplish from this program?” their answers were similar—they wanted the child to have fun and develop social skills. Parents with children participating in a music program also hoped their child would develop a sense of musical appreciation. On the other hand, parents with children involved in a movement program hoped their child’s coordination would improve.Many parents realize the importance of music and movement in their child’s life. Since parents are a child’s first teachers, it is important to include them in the program, especially at the toddler stage. Not only do toddlers try to gain adult approval, but they also need a security base as identified by Alicia Lieberman in The Emotional Life of a Toddler. When toddlers feel the security of a caregiver, they feel the strength and reassurance to become risk-takers and set out to explore the world around them. Once the toddler becomes unsure about a situation or becomes scared, they will go back to “home base” to recharge (so to say) before setting out again on a new adventure.Not only do caregivers provide security for the child, but they also facilitate, model, encourage, praise, and act as scaffold support for the child. The only role the caregivers and teachers do not share is that of an expert. The teacher passes on the content knowledge to the caregivers and children to practice not only during the program but also at home as well.Wow! A lot of information is contained within this lesson, but remember, you already have learned about child development, standards, curriculum design, creative expression and play in prior lessons. That knowledge will get you over halfway through this lesson and will be directly applied in Lessons 5 and 6! Remember, you can only eat an elephant one bite at a time. So, let’s start chomping!ReferencesGallagher, J., & Sayre, N.E. (2015). Movement and Music: Developing Activities for Young Children. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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