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   Part of the power of this play comes from the many ironies. When the town nee

  
Part of the power of this play comes from the many ironies. When the town needs
saving, the people of the town turn to the one who saved them before–Oedipus–because the townspeople
think Oedipus has tapped into the knowledge of the gods. Goodness, are they wrong or what! 
Answer the following questions: Keep in mind that this is an English class; therefore,
proofread your answer carefully before submitting, for I will take off points for
misspelled words as well as unclear answers. (Good luck).
1. What is the specific setting for the play Oedipus?
2. Who told Jocasta and Laius that their son would kill his father and marry his
mother? ­­­­­­_______________
3. Oedipus was reared in what city? __________________
By whom was Oedipus reared?
4.___________ 5__________
6. Name the place where Oedipus killed his father.
The sphinx has the body of a (an) 7____________, the head of a 8___________, and
the wings of a 9._______________
10. What was the riddle of the sphinx? __________________
Oedipus and Jocasta have 4 children. Name 2.
11___________ 12_______
13. Which god is responsible for the plague in Thebes? ___________________
Name the two persons Oedipus accused the plotting against him.
14_____________ 15_____________
16. Who tells Oedipus that his adopted father is dead? ___________________
17. Define the term, hubris. _____________________
18. Name the mountain on which Oedipus resolves to spend his Life.
19. __________is a group of Theban elders who are not privy to everything.
Name 3 functions of the Chorus. 20.______21___________. 22.________________.
State two themes for the play, Oedipus the King, and write a brief explanation for
each one.
23. Theme ____________________
24. Theme ____________________
 
25. Choose one character trait of Oedipus, the King, and write a brief
description. Your description should be well-developed.

Hello everyone, I think it is relatively safe to say that the fall of Camelot an

Hello everyone,
I think it is relatively safe to say that the fall of Camelot and the death of King Arthur was not by ones or two persons doing. The nights of the round table are having issues with accepting King Arthur for forgiving Sir Lancelot. Some won’t stand for it, while others will not speak negatively about the king as he made them the knights they are today. Having this disagreement would later commit to the overall death of king Arthur and the fall of Camelot. Now one can argue that the disagreements of the knights were influenced by the actions of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere. A lot of the issues could have been avoided had Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere not fallen in love making Sir Lancelot a prime target for opposition. 
King Arthur refusing to take in his son Sir Mordred was also a heavy point in the fall of Camelot. Had he taken him in and guided him, he could have avoided his own death. When King Arthur called for a treaty, they did not trust one another. Stating that if either of them see a single sword be drawn, to battle fiercely. “When King Arthur should depart, he warned all his host that and they see any sword drawn, ‘Look ye come on fiercely,  and slay that traitor Sir Mordred, for in no wise trust him.” (Malory 511).Well, when an adder bit one of the soldiers feet, he didn’t think much, drew his sword, and slain the adder. With that, they trumpets blared and the battle began. Thousands of men died, from both sides. Eventually Sir Mordred was slain by King Arthur, but not without a fight. As King Arthur stabbed his son, Mordred responded with a swift sword swipe to the side of the head that pierced the helmet, leading to the kings’ ultimate demise. 
In the end, it seems as both men and women are to blame for the actions that took place. Whether it be Queen Guinevere, or any of the knights and kings. They all are to blame. They could have avoided the fall of Camelot and the death of a husband and father. After the death of King Arthur, Queen Guenivere went away to become a nun, living out the rest of her life worshiping God and repenting from the sinful ways she had lived. “When Queen Guenivere understood that King Arthur was dead and all the noble knights, Sir Mordred, and all the remnant, then she stole away with five ladies with her, and so she went to Amesbury; and there she let make herself a nun, and wore white clothes and black, and great penance she took upon her as ever did sinful woman in this land. And never creature could make her merry; but ever she lived in fasting, prayers, and alms-deeds, that all manner of people marvelled how virtuously she was change.” (Malory 517). 
Overall I enjoyed reading the stories from this book that we have covered over the last two weeks. However, I will admit that at times I would have to take a step back and re-read the words as they can be hard to understand at times. 
Works Cited
Malory, Thomas, and Helen Cooper. Le Morte Darthur: The Winchester Manuscript. Oxford University Press, 1998.

C. Lo   The Timeless Themes of Shakespeare             What makes a story a stor

C. Lo
 
The Timeless Themes of Shakespeare
            What makes a story a story? Is it the desire to enter a different space along with following an interesting character, or is it the different settings that a character may go through? It is both these things and none of these things for without themes the two could not exist. This is something that I tell myself when I am creating the foundation and progressing through the stories that I write and to think that other authors would not do the same is absurd. William Shakespeare is no exception to this. Whether it be plays or poems, Shakespeare lets it be known of what he writes. It can be a tragedy, a love story, or a combination of the two; however, one cannot deny that Shakespeare knew how to connect the audience as well as the readers with his themes. ‘Sonnet 29’ says “I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featur’d like him, like him with friends possess’d,
Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope” (Shakespeare lines 2-7). Through these lines, we understand that one of the themes of the sonnet is despair. Our character is depressed, has lost all hope, and has become this state of hopelessness. With the theme of despair and the showing of our characters conflicts, they have created this foundation for this poem and have already thrown the reader right into the world of the story. Allowing them to connect with the character. I believe this is the reason why Shakespeare is still relevant today. The way he was able to create these stories through different forms of literature that allow the reader or the audience to connect with these characters so effortless is inspiring.
Works Cited
Shakespeare. “Sonnet 29”. British Literature I: Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century and Neoclassicism, Vol. 17, English Open Textbooks, 2018, pp. 1177-1184.
E. La
 
Willam Shakespeare’s work is widely regarded to be some of the most timeless works of literature to be written. This is most likely attributed to the subtle themes within his works being most grounded in people as a whole. Themes of revenge, love, death, and jealousy are common within his works, most notably in plays such as Romeo and Juliet and in his sonnets such as Sonnet 18. Shakespeare’s sonnet 18 is more or less a love letter to a significant other, comparing their appearance to a summer’s day and how that beauty will not fade, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate”. (Shakespeare 18) Comparisons like these are common in these sonnets, which is similar to how someone would try to engage with another person here in the modern day. Sonnet 18 in particular shows the timeless nature of Shakespeare and his works. Lines 13-14 read as “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see. So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” (Shakespeare 13-14). These last lines roughly translate to, as long as this sonnet remains relevant, you will live on. Shakespeare’s goal with this sonnet has become a reality, as the recipient of praise still lives on today in the form of this sonnet due to its continuous relevance. As long as his works remain, Shakespeare’s influence on modern culture will never die. The sonnets function as a form of time capsule, to not only see how far we as a civilization have come but to show how little human nature changed over time.  
Robinson, Bonnie J and Getty, Laura, British Literature I: Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century and Neoclassicism, (2018) English Open Textbooks 17
https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/english-textbooks/17, pp. 1177-1184. 

Prompt The heroes of all the myths we have covered thus far have been quite comp

Prompt
The heroes of all the myths we have covered thus far have been quite complex, and this week’s reading about Sigurth is no different. In this es.say, analyze how the poems describe Sigurth’s heroic accomplishments, and explain your impression of him. In doing so, pay close attention to his fight with the dragon, his promise to Brynhild, his pact with Gunner, and his ultimate betrayal.
Guidelines
• Your initial response should be at least 500 words in length
• Use MLA format for any quotations or citations that you use to support your answer
• Use size 12 font, one-inch margins, and double-spacing
• Consult the MLA Formatting and Style Guide to understand how to format citations and 
references and for general writing assistance (writing style, mechanics, grammar, etc.). 
Readings
The Poetic Edda: Stories Of The Norse Gods And Heroes, translated and edited by Jackson Crawford. Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., 2015.
Introduction, pp. ix to xxii
Voluspa, pp. 1 to 16
Havamal, pp. 17 to 47
Vafthurthnismal, pp. 48 to 59
Lokasenna, pp. 100 to 114
Thrymskvitha, pp. 115 to 122
Baldrs draumar, pp. 141 to 144
Rigsthula, pp. 145 to 155
Voluspa en skamma, pp. 156 to 167
Fra dautha Sinfjotla, pp. 218 to 219
Gripisspa, pp. 220 to 233
Reginsmal, pp. 234 to 240
Fafnismal, pp. 241 to 251
Sigrdrifumal, pp. 252 to 259
Brot af Sigurtharkvithu, pp. 260 to 265
Guthrunarkvitha I, pp. 266 to 272
Sigurtharkvitha en skamma, pp. 273 to 288
Helreith Brynhildar, pp. 289 to 292

Prompt The heroes of all the myths we have covered thus far have been quite comp

Prompt
The heroes of all the myths we have covered thus far have been quite complex, and this week’s reading about Sigurth is no different. In this es.say, analyze how the poems describe Sigurth’s heroic accomplishments, and explain your impression of him. In doing so, pay close attention to his fight with the dragon, his promise to Brynhild, his pact with Gunner, and his ultimate betrayal.
Guidelines
• Your initial response should be at least 500 words in length
• Use MLA format for any quotations or citations that you use to support your answer
• Use size 12 font, one-inch margins, and double-spacing
• Consult the MLA Formatting and Style Guide to understand how to format citations and 
references and for general writing assistance (writing style, mechanics, grammar, etc.). 
Readings
The Poetic Edda: Stories Of The Norse Gods And Heroes, translated and edited by Jackson Crawford. Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., 2015.
Introduction, pp. ix to xxii
Voluspa, pp. 1 to 16
Havamal, pp. 17 to 47
Vafthurthnismal, pp. 48 to 59
Lokasenna, pp. 100 to 114
Thrymskvitha, pp. 115 to 122
Baldrs draumar, pp. 141 to 144
Rigsthula, pp. 145 to 155
Voluspa en skamma, pp. 156 to 167
Fra dautha Sinfjotla, pp. 218 to 219
Gripisspa, pp. 220 to 233
Reginsmal, pp. 234 to 240
Fafnismal, pp. 241 to 251
Sigrdrifumal, pp. 252 to 259
Brot af Sigurtharkvithu, pp. 260 to 265
Guthrunarkvitha I, pp. 266 to 272
Sigurtharkvitha en skamma, pp. 273 to 288
Helreith Brynhildar, pp. 289 to 292

C. Lo   The Timeless Themes of Shakespeare             What makes a story a stor

C. Lo
 
The Timeless Themes of Shakespeare
            What makes a story a story? Is it the desire to enter a different space along with following an interesting character, or is it the different settings that a character may go through? It is both these things and none of these things for without themes the two could not exist. This is something that I tell myself when I am creating the foundation and progressing through the stories that I write and to think that other authors would not do the same is absurd. William Shakespeare is no exception to this. Whether it be plays or poems, Shakespeare lets it be known of what he writes. It can be a tragedy, a love story, or a combination of the two; however, one cannot deny that Shakespeare knew how to connect the audience as well as the readers with his themes. ‘Sonnet 29’ says “I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featur’d like him, like him with friends possess’d,
Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope” (Shakespeare lines 2-7). Through these lines, we understand that one of the themes of the sonnet is despair. Our character is depressed, has lost all hope, and has become this state of hopelessness. With the theme of despair and the showing of our characters conflicts, they have created this foundation for this poem and have already thrown the reader right into the world of the story. Allowing them to connect with the character. I believe this is the reason why Shakespeare is still relevant today. The way he was able to create these stories through different forms of literature that allow the reader or the audience to connect with these characters so effortless is inspiring.
Works Cited
Shakespeare. “Sonnet 29”. British Literature I: Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century and Neoclassicism, Vol. 17, English Open Textbooks, 2018, pp. 1177-1184.
E. La
 
Willam Shakespeare’s work is widely regarded to be some of the most timeless works of literature to be written. This is most likely attributed to the subtle themes within his works being most grounded in people as a whole. Themes of revenge, love, death, and jealousy are common within his works, most notably in plays such as Romeo and Juliet and in his sonnets such as Sonnet 18. Shakespeare’s sonnet 18 is more or less a love letter to a significant other, comparing their appearance to a summer’s day and how that beauty will not fade, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate”. (Shakespeare 18) Comparisons like these are common in these sonnets, which is similar to how someone would try to engage with another person here in the modern day. Sonnet 18 in particular shows the timeless nature of Shakespeare and his works. Lines 13-14 read as “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see. So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” (Shakespeare 13-14). These last lines roughly translate to, as long as this sonnet remains relevant, you will live on. Shakespeare’s goal with this sonnet has become a reality, as the recipient of praise still lives on today in the form of this sonnet due to its continuous relevance. As long as his works remain, Shakespeare’s influence on modern culture will never die. The sonnets function as a form of time capsule, to not only see how far we as a civilization have come but to show how little human nature changed over time.  
Robinson, Bonnie J and Getty, Laura, British Literature I: Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century and Neoclassicism, (2018) English Open Textbooks 17
https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/english-textbooks/17, pp. 1177-1184. 

Prompt Camelot is generally considered an idyllic place, and the core values of

Prompt
Camelot is generally considered an idyllic place, and the core values of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table uphold the importance of equality among all. In this es.say, consider how the downfall of Camelot ultimately occurs. Is it through the fault of one or two individuals, or do the issues extend well beyond a small group of characters? In answering this question, consider the representation of both men and women, and explain the series of events that lead to the end of this mythical realm. Be certain to use examples and/or quotes from the text to support your answer.
Guidelines
• Your initial response should be at least 500 words in length
• Use MLA format for any quotations or citations that you use to support your answer
• Use size 12 font, one-inch margins, and double-spacing
• Consult the MLA Formatting and Style Guide to understand how to format citations and 
references and for general writing assistance (writing style, mechanics, grammar, etc.). 
Readings
Malory, Thomas. Le Morte d’Arthur: The Winchester Manuscript, edited by Helen Cooper. Oxford University Press, 2008.
The Noble Tale of the Sangrail, pp. 310 to 320
Of Sir Galahad, pp. 321 to 326
Of Sir Lancelot, pp. 329 to 334
Of Lancelot, pp. 388 to 394
The Tale of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere, pp. 403 to 467
The Death of Arthur, pp. 468 to 527

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